Check out the animated show Bat out of Hell on Kickstarter!

Archives for June 2016

Hotel St. James

ramada-gaslamp-convention-center-managers-special-at-california-top

This transitory home is domicile
To gas lamp buildings lit like bric-a-brac—
And, blazoning scripted signage, its track
Of squiggled neon sings its beacon style.
Backlit by night, the city’s surge decrees
The surf and wash of California dusk
And beauty visits with a thousand vacancies.
The hotel’s silent windows blindly ask
The passing sun to make each pane a bed,
Each frame an invitation and each sill
A resting place where passing fancies perch
Like gulls that gather faith in wind to spread
Their wings. So San Diego’s pilgrims will
Divine each door a way, each room a church.

Would-be director of The Moviegoer set to release The Voyage of Time


It’s ridiculous to say there are amazing visuals here – of course there are – most of them familiar, or as it now needs to be said, “Malickian”. I’m looking forward to seeing both versions, the IMAX narrated by Brad Pitt and the feature narrated by Cate Blanchett. I have to admit, I’m somewhat more excited about the latter, as I’m looking forward to knowing more about the content. To say nothing of Blanchett’s voice.

Regarding the content, we know Malick was/is fairly interested in Heidegger (which may well have been what drew him to Percy, if not versa-vice), author, of course of Being and Time. He has an early book called “The History of the Concept of Time”, and it’ll be interesting to see if Malick draws on this at all, or deals with the chicken-and-egg question of whether it is Time or Being that is primordial (Heidegger’s big question in B&T).

If we speak of Time (as primordial), do we not assume that Time “is”? If we speak of Being as primordial, does Time then become illusory (or perhaps even non-being)? In short, why the voyage “of” time, rather than “through” time? If time itself is the Voyager, through or by what does it actualize itself (or become actualized)? Well, Being, perhaps. I would like to see if/how Malick will reveal these questions visually.

As I’ve noted here before, film and music are mediums uniquely fit for exploring these ideas, as they themselves exist (rather than simply being represented, à la Dali in The Persistence of Memory) in time.

And of course Augustine. What a treat to hear Cate Blanchett read from chapter 11 of Confessions!

Inlander Staff Pick

Damn Good Cookie

Chris Cook interview on KPBX

From the Studio: Poet Chris Cook’s “Damn Good Cookie”

We had Chris Cook in the studio to talk about his most recent book Damn Good Cookie, a collection of original poems. Chris talked with Verne about what he does when he’s not playing trumpet with the Spokane Symphony–writing and reading poems. And that’s exactly what he’ll be doing this Saturday, June 18th at 7:30pm at Auntie’s Bookstore. Chris gave us a preview of that reading with a selection of poems, and he also talked about his writing and ideation process. Damn Good Cookie was published this past May by Korrektiv Press.

“Meter Master” — Spokesman-Review feature article on Chris Cook

Chris Cook

“Damn Good Cookie” (Korrektiv Press, $15), which hits shelves on Saturday, is Cook’s second book of poetry, following 2014’s “The View from the Broken Mic.” It features 42 poems, all of which Cook has performed for audiences. Some of them are relatively new, while others have been in his repertoire for more than a decade. “I’m pretty proud of this one. It shows a more complete writer,” Cook said.
Read more.

Damn Good Cookie Book Launch, June 18, 7pm at Auntie’s

Damn Good, Cookie

Enjoy an evening of poetry this Saturday night at Auntie’s Bookstore in Spokane with Chris Cook, the proprietor of Auntie’s 3-Minute Mic reading series. Cook is the author of two poetry collections: The View from the Broken Mic and his newest book Damn Good Cookie.

In the Spokane tradition of Vachel Lindsay, Chris Cook sings. Before you register the dark humor, the sharp satire, or the elegant constructions of the meter, you’ll notice the music of these poems. Whether at the park, in memory, or elsewhere on the periphery, Cook writes large-hearted poems that remind us how poetry moves: from ear to mind to heart.

Wow. Just…

wow.