Chesterton at the End, Part 2

Craig Burrell (a Friend of Korrektiv from way back) takes up the posthumous Hitchens essay on Chesterton.

(We’ve been waiting for word on this since our own Matthew Lickona (formerly a Friend of Korrektiv, now fully assimilated (resistance is few-tile BadCatholic cum Existentialesque blogosphere)) posted this postmortem, prepublication teaser).

Okay. Take it away Mr. Burrell:

But the Chesterton that I most admire doesn’t make it into Hitchens’ essay at all; indeed, the overall portrait he draws is strangely sullied and partial, as though viewed through a blackened window. Chesterton had a big heart. He loved life, was full of joy and good humour, and lived with a sense of wonder that most of us lose in childhood. His life exemplified the beauty of the virtue of humility, which he always claimed was at the heart of any just appreciation of the goodness of the world. To Hitchens all this is apparently “frivolous”.

Comments

  1. Thanks for that, Jonathan. Somehow I had missed Part I. Pretty fascinating, and pretty dang too bad.

  2. The world’s serious, but it has its tawdry theatres.

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